{ "objects" : [ { "embark_ID" : 15063, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/15063", "Disp_Access_No" : "1981.31", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1980", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1980", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1980", "Disp_Title" : "The Unending Story [Historia sin fin]", "Alt_Title" : "[Historia sin fin]", "Obj_Title" : "Historia sin fin [The Unending Story]", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Liliana Porter", "Sort_Artist" : "Porter, Liliana", "Disp_Dimen" : "158 cm x 214.7 cm (62 3/16 in. x 84 1/2 in.)", "Disp_Height" : "158 cm", "Disp_Width" : "214.7 cm", "Dimen_Extent" : "Sight", "Medium" : "Acrylic, silkscreen, drawing, and collage", "Support" : "canvas", "Disp_Medium" : "Acrylic, silkscreen, drawing, and collage on canvas", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Liliana Porter’s art is traversed by a deep concern for language, which shapes works like this one in unexpected ways. Her favorite writer is her compatriot Jorge Luis Borges, known for blurring the line between reality and illusion in his stories. Porter plays with this idea by combining two-dimensional images with three-dimensional objects glued onto the canvas, the latter demanding close observation to be perceived as volumetric. She further challenges our perception of the real by visually quoting another writer, Lewis Carroll. The main character in "Alice in Wonderland" grapples with a confusing dreamlike world she found on the other side of the mirror. Such interest in language also shaped the way Porter arranged objects on the canvas, as if they were a sentence written on a page whose corner lifts slightly near the bottom edge. ", "Dedication" : "Blanton Museum of Art, The University of Texas at Austin, The Barbara Duncan Fund in memory of Rocío Duncan, 1981", "Copyright_Type" : "All", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "painting", "Creation_Place2" : "Argentinean", "Department" : "Latin American Art", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/1981.31.tif", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/1981.31.tif", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/1981.31.tif", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/1981.31.tif", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "1192", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/1981.31.tif", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/1981.31.tif", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/1981.31.tif", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/1981.31.tif", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "4222", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 7882, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/7882", "Disp_Access_No" : "1993.86", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1988", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1988", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1988", "Disp_Title" : "The Fallen Jar", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "The Fallen Jar", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Liliana Porter", "Sort_Artist" : "Porter, Liliana", "Disp_Dimen" : "105 cm x 74.6 cm (41 5/16 in. x 29 3/8 in.)", "Disp_Height" : "105 cm", "Disp_Width" : "74.6 cm", "Dimen_Extent" : "Sheet", "Medium" : "Offset lithograph, two-color etching, softground etching, and screenprint; 30/35", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Offset lithograph, two-color etching, softground etching, and screenprint; 30/35", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Though Porter has created what is essentially a still life, she challenges the conventions of that genre through the use of spontaneous, gestural drawing and the suggestion of movement. Both help to create a dynamic image that transforms a traditionally formal and static genre. Porter, however, uses a typical aspect of still life painting, the momento mori, to comment on the passage of time. The momento mori, usually a decaying flower or skull, in this case a fallen jar, suggests the transient nature of life. ", "Dedication" : "Blanton Museum of Art, The University of Texas at Austin, Gift of the artist, 1993", "Copyright_Type" : "All", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "print", "Creation_Place2" : "Argentinean", "Department" : "Prints and Drawings; Latin American Art", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/1993.86.tif", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/1993.86.tif", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/1993.86.tif", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/1993.86.tif", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "1630", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 17737, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/17737", "Disp_Access_No" : "2005.174", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "2005", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "2005", "_Disp_End_Date" : "2005", "Disp_Title" : "Trabajo forzado [Forced Labor]", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "Trabajo forzado [Forced Labor]", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Liliana Porter", "Sort_Artist" : "Porter, Liliana", "Disp_Dimen" : "5 cm x 110 cm x 26 cm (1 15/16 in. x 43 5/16 in. x 10 1/4 in.)", "Disp_Height" : "5 cm", "Disp_Width" : "110 cm", "Dimen_Extent" : "shelf", "Medium" : "Shelf, plastic figure, mulch", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Shelf, plastic figure, mulch", "Info_Page_Comm" : "A major figure in the development of Conceptual art since the 1960s, Porter continues to produce work with a unique blend of humor and literary or philosophical references. In Trabajo forzado, a tiny figure seems to be engaged in the monumental task of moving a large amount of mulch onto the floor. Given the sizes of the figure and pile, the little man must have been hard at work for a very long time. Unlike Camnitzer, Porter avoids severity and chooses to address injustice in a playful and absurd fashion. Through the use of humor, she is able to call attention to the plight of the ordinary person, long-standing social inequalities, and the punishingly hard nature of continuous physical labor. ", "Dedication" : "Blanton Museum of Art, The University of Texas at Austin, Gift of Judy S. and Charles W. Tate, 2005", "Copyright_Type" : "all approved.", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "installation", "Creation_Place2" : "Argentinean", "Department" : "Latin American Art", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/2005.174_detail.tif", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/2005.174_detail.tif", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/2005.174_detail.tif", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/2005.174_detail.tif", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "3616", "Image_Type" : "Digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/2005.174.tif", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/2005.174.tif", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/2005.174.tif", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/2005.174.tif", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "6501", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] }, ] }