{ "objects" : [ { "embark_ID" : 14276, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/14276", "Disp_Access_No" : "2001.82", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1967-1970", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1967", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1970", "Disp_Title" : "Stroke", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "Stroke", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Lee Lozano", "Sort_Artist" : "Lozano, Lee", "Disp_Dimen" : "106.68 cm x 106.68 cm (42 in. x 42 in.)", "Disp_Height" : "106.68 cm", "Disp_Width" : "106.68 cm", "Dimen_Extent" : "each panel", "Medium" : "Oil", "Support" : "canvas", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on canvas", "Info_Page_Comm" : "By the mid-1960s, Lee Lozano was known for her monumental paintings of hardware. In the latter half of that decade, however, Lozano shifted gears, translating her signature style into a more sculptural language. With "Stroke" the artist broke free of the constraints of the canvas by perforating and layering canvases themselves. Using tools rather than depicting them, Lozano moved beyond two-dimensional painting to engage “real space” both in her process and in her finished work. Indeed, she referred to this body of work as “energy paintings,” aiming to capture “the energy which emanates from the forever conflict in painting between . . . its static solid-matter surface and the passages of movement and time it evokes in the mind.”", "Dedication" : "Blanton Museum of Art, The University of Texas at Austin, Purchase through the generosity of The Judith Rothschild Foundation and the Michener Acquisitions Fund, 2001", "Copyright_Type" : "", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "painting", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "American and Contemporary Art", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/2001.82.tif", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/2001.82.tif", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/2001.82.tif", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/2001.82.tif", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "1747", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/2001.82-1.tif", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/2001.82-1.tif", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/2001.82-1.tif", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/2001.82-1.tif", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "15800", "Image_Type" : "Digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 14116, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/14116", "Disp_Access_No" : "G1968.92", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1964", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1964", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1964", "Disp_Title" : "Ream", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "Ream", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Lee Lozano", "Sort_Artist" : "Lozano, Lee", "Disp_Dimen" : "198 x 244 cm (78 x 96 in.)", "Disp_Height" : "198 cm", "Disp_Width" : "244 cm", "Dimen_Extent" : "Canvas", "Medium" : "Oil", "Support" : "canvas", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on canvas", "Info_Page_Comm" : "From 1963 to 1964, Lee Lozano took hardware—screwdrivers, hammers, wrenches—as her pictorial focus. Here, Lozano takes a reamer (a device used to drill holes) as her subject. Ensconced in a male-dominated art world, Lozano preyed on the provocative connotations of tools to poke fun at the chauvinistic climate in which she found herself. The artist manipulated and anthropomorphized her subjects to imbue them with new (often humorous, sexualized) meaning. At the same time, the sci-fi quality of these mechanized images tapped into the popularity of science fiction at that time— in art historian Helen Molesworth’s words, we might think of Lozano’s tool paintings as “cyborg fantasies of a complete merger of body and machine.”", "Dedication" : "Blanton Museum of Art, The University of Texas at Austin, Gift of Mari and James A. Michener, 1968", "Copyright_Type" : "", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "painting", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "American and Contemporary Art", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/G1968.92.tif", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/G1968.92.tif", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/G1968.92.tif", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/G1968.92.tif", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "2383", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/G1968.92.mp3", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/G1968.92.mp3", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/G1968.92.mp3", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/G1968.92.mp3", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "8449", "Image_Type" : "audio", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "This is an excerpt from a tape James Michener made commenting on the source of paintings in his collection, probably recorded around 1968.", "View" : "" } , ] }, ] }