{ "objects" : [ { "embark_ID" : 14440, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/14440", "Disp_Access_No" : "1991.324", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1936", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1936", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1936", "Disp_Title" : "Transients", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "Transients", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Raphael Soyer", "Sort_Artist" : "Soyer, Raphael", "Disp_Dimen" : "95.3 cm x 86.7 cm (37 1/2 in. x 34 1/8 in.)", "Disp_Height" : "95.3 cm", "Disp_Width" : "86.7 cm", "Dimen_Extent" : "Sight", "Medium" : "Oil", "Support" : "canvas", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on canvas", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Raphael Soyer was one of the leading proponents of a painting style called Social Realism, whose aim was to document the social and political mood of life during the years of the Great Depression. While other Social Realists, like Philip Evergood, were known for their searing indictments of poverty, Soyer’s tone was gentler and more sympathetic, though no less a call to action. His renderings of individuals, like these men waiting for public assistance, encourage the viewer to identify with the subjects and to empathize with their boredom and despair. Each weathered face in this group is an individual portrait—in fact, the figure on the left is Walter Broe, a homeless man who the artist employed as a model on many occasions, and the yawning figure toward the right rear is Raphael Soyer himself. Drawing and painting from models provided the foundation for Soyer’s practice, and he gained his carefully articulated insights from direct observation. His brand of realism was marked by its unflinching honesty and uncommon humanity. In many ways his paintings act as counterpoints to the great documentary photographs of the era taken by artists such as Dorothea Lange and Walker Evans. ", "Dedication" : "Blanton Museum of Art, The University of Texas at Austin, Gift of Mari and James A. Michener, 1991", "Copyright_Type" : "Does not allow for web use or merchandise.", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "painting", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "American and Contemporary Art", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/1991.324.mp3", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/1991.324.mp3", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/1991.324.mp3", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/1991.324.mp3", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "6892", "Image_Type" : "audio", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "This is an excerpt from a tape James Michener made commenting on the source of paintings in his collection, probably recorded around 1968.", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/1991.324.tif", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/1991.324.tif", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/1991.324.tif", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/1991.324.tif", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "1571", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 13958, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/13958", "Disp_Access_No" : "P1969.15.2", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1940-1949", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1940", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1949", "Disp_Title" : "Portrait of a Girl (Cynthia Brown)", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "Portrait of a Girl (Cynthia Brown)", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Raphael Soyer", "Sort_Artist" : "Soyer, Raphael", "Disp_Dimen" : "41 cm x 30 cm (16 1/8 in. x 11 13/16 in.)", "Disp_Height" : "41 cm", "Disp_Width" : "30 cm", "Dimen_Extent" : "Canvas", "Medium" : "Oil", "Support" : "canvas", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on canvas", "Info_Page_Comm" : "A young girl, whose hollow eyes and cheeks belie her age, clasps her hands tightly in her lap. Black hair, dress, chair, floor and shadows fuse together into a flat bodily form that serves to highlight the exactness of distinct facial features. Loose brushwork and complex shading and blending, especially in shadows and backdrop, create a simple, unified statement about the nature and effects of hardship. Like the painting of his brother Moses, Raphael Soyer’s work shows the influences of Edgar Degas and of American Realists like Thomas Eakins. Soyer once recalled: “I tried to paint my portraits in the manner of Eakins, completely without ingratiation, starkly honest.” Soyer’s dark palette and exaggerated realism yield contemplative portraits that hint of sadness or loneliness, a tone found in many of his best-known works from the 1930s and 40s ", "Dedication" : "Blanton Museum of Art, The University of Texas at Austin, Michener Acquisitions Fund, 1969", "Copyright_Type" : "", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "painting", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "American and Contemporary Art", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/P1969.15.2.tif", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/P1969.15.2.tif", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/P1969.15.2.tif", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/P1969.15.2.tif", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "2513", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] }, ] }