{ "objects" : [ { "embark_ID" : 13878, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/13878", "Disp_Access_No" : "P1976.10.1", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1976", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1976", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1976", "Disp_Title" : "Large Decoy [Reclama grande]", "Alt_Title" : "Señuelo grande", "Obj_Title" : "Large Decoy [Reclama grande]", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Marcelo Bonevardi", "Sort_Artist" : "Bonevardi, Marcelo", "Disp_Dimen" : "228.6 cm x 193 cm x 10.2 cm (90 in. x 76 in. x 4 in.)", "Disp_Height" : "228.6 cm", "Disp_Width" : "193 cm", "Dimen_Extent" : "Canvas", "Medium" : "Rhoplex acrylic medium, dry pigments, and Dex-o-Tex cement on burlap and wood with wood objects", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Rhoplex acrylic medium, dry pigments, and Dex-o-Tex cement on burlap and wood with wood objects", "Info_Page_Comm" : "", "Dedication" : "Blanton Museum of Art, The University of Texas at Austin, Barbara Duncan Fund, 1976", "Copyright_Type" : "", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "construction", "Creation_Place2" : "Argentinean", "Department" : "Latin American Art", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/P1976.10.1.tif", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/P1976.10.1.tif", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/P1976.10.1.tif", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/P1976.10.1.tif", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "4217", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 13908, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/13908", "Disp_Access_No" : "P1973.11.3", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1963", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1963", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1963", "Disp_Title" : "Cerrado por brujería [Closed for Witchcraft]", "Alt_Title" : "[Closed for Sorcery]", "Obj_Title" : "Cerrado por brujería [Closed for Witchcraft]", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Luis Felipe Noé", "Sort_Artist" : "Noé, Luis Felipe", "Disp_Dimen" : "199.6 cm x 249.7 cm (78 9/16 in. x 98 5/16 in.)", "Disp_Height" : "199.6 cm", "Disp_Width" : "249.7 cm", "Dimen_Extent" : "Canvas", "Medium" : "Oil and collage", "Support" : "canvas", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil and collage on canvas", "Info_Page_Comm" : "The notion of chaos as the primary state of the universe has been an ongoing concern in Luis Felipe Noé’s art. In 1962, Noé understood chaos as a tension between opposite forces. In a bold, expressionistic style he presents a Catholic prelate in a dominant position above talking heads trapped in a black grid. As the nation’s official religion, Catholicism played a complex role in shaping Argentine society. A controversial 1963 law assigned the Church the function of rating plays and films for the Argentine public. The red cross here is an ambiguous symbol, offering comfort to the alienated while enforcing through censorship officially sanctioned Western and Christian values.", "Dedication" : "Blanton Museum of Art, The University of Texas at Austin, Archer M. Huntington Museum Fund, 1973", "Copyright_Type" : "edu; promo; merch; web", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "painting", "Creation_Place2" : "Argentinean", "Department" : "Latin American Art", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/P1973.11.3_2017.tif", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/P1973.11.3_2017.tif", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/P1973.11.3_2017.tif", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/P1973.11.3_2017.tif", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "15810", "Image_Type" : "Digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 13909, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/13909", "Disp_Access_No" : "P1973.11.2", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1964", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1964", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1964", "Disp_Title" : "Vivir: a los saltos [To Live: By Leaps and Bounds]", "Alt_Title" : "[To Live: By Leaps and Bounds]", "Obj_Title" : "Vivir: a los saltos [To Live: By Leaps and Bounds]", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Rómulo Macció", "Sort_Artist" : "Macció, Rómulo", "Disp_Dimen" : "183.2 cm x 183 cm (72 1/8 in. x 72 1/16 in.)", "Disp_Height" : "183.2 cm", "Disp_Width" : "183 cm", "Dimen_Extent" : "Frame", "Medium" : "Acrylic, tempera and/or poster paint, and pencil", "Support" : "particle board", "Disp_Medium" : "Acrylic, tempera and/or poster paint, and pencil on particle board", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Rómulo Macció’s title for this painting implies both a positive call to action and an ironic critique of mass media and consumer society. The central rectangle recalls a television screen, and the influence of popular media was indeed one of the hotly debated political issues of the 1960s. He interrupts the composition—as commercials interrupt a seamless television show—to suggest a sinister presence lurking behind our everyday lives. Macció’s incorporation of masks and deformed faces adds to the painting’s sense of horror and may reflect the currency of Jean-Paul Sartre’s philosophical ideas of existentialism in Buenos Aires.", "Dedication" : "Blanton Museum of Art, The University of Texas at Austin, Archer M. Huntington Museum Fund, 1973", "Copyright_Type" : "edu; promo; merch; web", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "painting", "Creation_Place2" : "Argentinean", "Department" : "Latin American Art", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/P1973.11.2.tif", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/P1973.11.2.tif", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/P1973.11.2.tif", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/P1973.11.2.tif", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "2545", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/P1973.11.2.tif", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/P1973.11.2.tif", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/P1973.11.2.tif", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/P1973.11.2.tif", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "2725", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 13923, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/13923", "Disp_Access_No" : "P1970.6.2", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1970", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1970", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1970", "Disp_Title" : "Gran tensión no. 2 [Great Tension no. 2]", "Alt_Title" : "Great Tension No. 2", "Obj_Title" : "Gran tensión no. 2 [Great Tension no. 2]", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Ary Brizzi", "Sort_Artist" : "Brizzi, Ary", "Disp_Dimen" : "150 cm x 150 cm (59 1/16 in. x 59 1/16 in.)", "Disp_Height" : "150 cm", "Disp_Width" : "150 cm", "Dimen_Extent" : "Canvas", "Medium" : "Acrylic", "Support" : "canvas", "Disp_Medium" : "Acrylic on canvas", "Info_Page_Comm" : "", "Dedication" : "Blanton Museum of Art, The University of Texas at Austin, Archer M. Huntington Museum Fund, 1970", "Copyright_Type" : "edu; promo; merch; web", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "painting", "Creation_Place2" : "Argentinean", "Department" : "Latin American Art", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/P1970.6.2.tif", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/P1970.6.2.tif", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/P1970.6.2.tif", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/P1970.6.2.tif", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "9094", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 14031, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/14031", "Disp_Access_No" : "G1975.35.1", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "circa 1964", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1959", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1969", "Disp_Title" : "X en la calle 13 [X on 13th Street]", "Alt_Title" : "(X on 13th Street)", "Obj_Title" : "X en la calle 13 [X on 13th Street]", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Sarah Grilo", "Sort_Artist" : "Grilo, Sarah", "Disp_Dimen" : "101.8 cm x 102 cm (40 1/16 in. x 40 3/16 in.)", "Disp_Height" : "101.8 cm", "Disp_Width" : "102 cm", "Dimen_Extent" : "Canvas", "Medium" : "Mixed media", "Support" : "canvas", "Disp_Medium" : "Mixed media on canvas", "Info_Page_Comm" : ""X en la calle 13" reflects Sarah Grilo’s experiences of living in New York City during the 1960s. This period marks an important transition in her work as she moved away from her earlier geometric paintings focused on color harmonies. Here, she mixed the techniques of Informalism with the use of language to suggest the graffiti and splashes of color one finds on a gritty urban wall. Her operation is somewhat paradoxical since it is the walls themselves that acquire the look of abstract paintings over time.", "Dedication" : "Blanton Museum of Art, The University of Texas at Austin, Gift of Jordan Metzger, 1975", "Copyright_Type" : "", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "painting", "Creation_Place2" : "Argentinean", "Department" : "Latin American Art", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/G1975.35.1.tif", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/G1975.35.1.tif", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/G1975.35.1.tif", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/G1975.35.1.tif", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "3024", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 14058, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/14058", "Disp_Access_No" : "G1973.12.16", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1965", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1965", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1965", "Disp_Title" : "Caída de conciencia [Loss of Consciousness]", "Alt_Title" : "Loss of Consciousness", "Obj_Title" : "Caída de conciencia [Loss of Consciousness]", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Jorge de la Vega", "Sort_Artist" : "Vega, Jorge de la", "Disp_Dimen" : "130.6 cm x 110.4 cm (51 7/16 in. x 43 7/16 in.)", "Disp_Height" : "130.6 cm", "Disp_Width" : "110.4 cm", "Dimen_Extent" : "canvas", "Medium" : "Oil, glass, and fabric", "Support" : "canvas", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil, glass, and fabric on canvas", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Jorge de la Vega relied on experimental techniques to generate an imaginary universe populated by monstrous beasts and distorted figures. The poetic title of this work is a pun on the common Spanish expression "toma de conciencia" [becoming aware]. It suggests that existence becomes conflicted by our inability to resolve the contradictions between gaining and losing awareness. De la Vega seems inspired by existentialism as he literally splits the self in two, using collaged linen to represent a male figure and its distorted double. This elongated image was created by rubbing linen directly over the wrinkled canvas. The resulting copy was then stretched and glued onto the surface of the work. The figure and his elongated doppelgänger float in close proximity, but their relationship remains unsettled.", "Dedication" : "Blanton Museum of Art, The University of Texas at Austin, Gift of Barbara Duncan, 1973", "Copyright_Type" : "edu; promo; merch; web", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "painting", "Creation_Place2" : "Argentinean", "Department" : "Latin American Art", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/G1973.12.16.tif", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/G1973.12.16.tif", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/G1973.12.16.tif", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/G1973.12.16.tif", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "2438", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 14097, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/14097", "Disp_Access_No" : "G1971.3.19", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1964", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1964", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1964", "Disp_Title" : "Al gran pueblo argentino...[To the Great Argentine Nation...]", "Alt_Title" : "To the Great Argentinean Nation...", "Obj_Title" : "Al gran pueblo argentino...[To the Great Argentine Nation...]", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "José Antonio Fernández-Muro", "Sort_Artist" : "Fernández-Muro, José Antonio", "Disp_Dimen" : "176 cm x 145 cm (69 5/16 in. x 57 1/16 in.)", "Disp_Height" : "176 cm", "Disp_Width" : "145 cm", "Dimen_Extent" : "canvas", "Medium" : "Acrylic wash over aluminum foil gilt construction", "Support" : "canvas", "Disp_Medium" : "Acrylic wash over aluminum foil gilt construction on canvas", "Info_Page_Comm" : "José Antonio Fernández-Muro rose to national attention in Argentina as a pioneer of the lyrical geometrical abstraction common in the 1950s. His work of the period already showed an interest in the tension between strict geometry and more tactile expressions. Then in 1963 he moved to New York, where he began to use metal foil to emboss signs and manhole covers for inclusion in his work, thus introducing elements from the real world while still keeping a commitment to formal geometry. Here he has placed the foil manhole cover among a jumble of letters and numbers embossed from street signs. The whole has an urban, gritty feel, but the arrangement of the elements in the image also recalls the Argentine national flag, a reference that is underscored by the title, which comes from the national anthem: "Al gran pueblo argentino, salud! [Good health to the Great Argentine People!]." To complete the quoted reference, the word salud ("good health") appears written out along the bottom of the painting. While the overall somber mood of this work may seem to suggest a difficult or complex relationship to his homeland, the artist has denied any overt political intention in his work. ", "Dedication" : "Blanton Museum of Art, The University of Texas at Austin, Gift of John and Barbara Duncan, 1971", "Copyright_Type" : "All approved.", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "painting", "Creation_Place2" : "Argentinean", "Department" : "Latin American Art", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/G1971.3.19.tif", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/G1971.3.19.tif", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/G1971.3.19.tif", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/G1971.3.19.tif", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "2403", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 14101, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/14101", "Disp_Access_No" : "G1971.3.12", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1969", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1969", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1969", "Disp_Title" : "Superficie activada núm. 2 [Activated Surface no. 2]", "Alt_Title" : "Activated Surface No. 2", "Obj_Title" : "Superficie activada núm. 2 [Activated Surface no. 2]", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Ary Brizzi", "Sort_Artist" : "Brizzi, Ary", "Disp_Dimen" : "170.5 cm x 168.9 cm (67 1/8 in. x 66 1/2 in.)", "Disp_Height" : "170.5 cm", "Disp_Width" : "168.9 cm", "Dimen_Extent" : "Canvas", "Medium" : "Acrylic", "Support" : "canvas", "Disp_Medium" : "Acrylic on canvas", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Ary Brizzi’s geometric paintings are elegant, technically rigorous, and conversant with Kinetic and Op art of the 1960s. At the time, Brizzi painted compositions of thin parallel bands that generated optical vibrations. In this example, the subtle color gradations and precise change in trajectory of the blue, black, and gold lines suggest two mirrored shapes that seem to overlap in a shallow space. Brizzi’s use of a diamond-shaped canvas and vibrating cerulean blues enhances the dynamism of this piece.", "Dedication" : "Blanton Museum of Art, The University of Texas at Austin, Gift of John and Barbara Duncan, 1971", "Copyright_Type" : "edu; promo; merch; web", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "painting", "Creation_Place2" : "Argentinean", "Department" : "Latin American Art", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/G1971.3.12-old.tif", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/G1971.3.12-old.tif", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/G1971.3.12-old.tif", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/G1971.3.12-old.tif", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "6353", "Image_Type" : "Digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/G1971.3.12.tif", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/G1971.3.12.tif", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/G1971.3.12.tif", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/G1971.3.12.tif", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "14274", "Image_Type" : "Digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 14411, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/14411", "Disp_Access_No" : "1991.420", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1963", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1963", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1963", "Disp_Title" : "El académico [The Academic]", "Alt_Title" : "The Academic", "Obj_Title" : "El académico [The Academic]", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Antonio Seguí", "Sort_Artist" : "Seguí, Antonio", "Disp_Dimen" : "150 cm x 150.2 cm (59 1/16 in. x 59 1/8 in.)", "Disp_Height" : "150 cm", "Disp_Width" : "150.2 cm", "Dimen_Extent" : "Canvas", "Medium" : "Oil and industrial lacquer", "Support" : "canvas", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil and industrial lacquer on canvas", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Antonio Seguí moved to Paris in 1963 and shared a studio with Romulo Macció. They had in common an interest in expressionistic figuration, which Seguí pursued for the rest of his career. “El académico” is part of a gallery of ironic portraits produced in the early 1960s, through which Seguí challenged authority figures. Here, a learned man seems to hold court on a throne-like chair. The clear labeling and his unsettled expression suggests that he is no longer an agent validating knowledge, but an historical subject put on display. ", "Dedication" : "Blanton Museum of Art, The University of Texas at Austin, Gift of Barbara Duncan, 1991", "Copyright_Type" : "Approval on case by case basis.", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "painting", "Creation_Place2" : "Argentinean", "Department" : "Latin American Art", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/1991.420.tif", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/1991.420.tif", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/1991.420.tif", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/1991.420.tif", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "3354", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 14413, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/14413", "Disp_Access_No" : "1991.418", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1980", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1980", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1980", "Disp_Title" : "Dos diagonales [Two Diagonals]", "Alt_Title" : "Two Diagonals", "Obj_Title" : "Dos diagonales [Two Diagonals]", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Rogelio Polesello", "Sort_Artist" : "Polesello, Rogelio", "Disp_Dimen" : "161 cm x 161 cm (63 3/8 in. x 63 3/8 in.)", "Disp_Height" : "161 cm", "Disp_Width" : "161 cm", "Dimen_Extent" : "Canvas", "Medium" : "Acrylic", "Support" : "canvas", "Disp_Medium" : "Acrylic on canvas", "Info_Page_Comm" : "", "Dedication" : "Blanton Museum of Art, The University of Texas at Austin, Gift of Barbara Duncan, 1991", "Copyright_Type" : "", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "painting", "Creation_Place2" : "Argentinean", "Department" : "Latin American Art", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/1991.418.tif", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/1991.418.tif", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/1991.418.tif", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/1991.418.tif", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "8800", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 14720, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/14720", "Disp_Access_No" : "1986.304", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1975", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1975", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1975", "Disp_Title" : "Hidroluz [Hydrolight]", "Alt_Title" : "Hydrolight", "Obj_Title" : "Hidroluz [Hydrolight]", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Gyula Kosice", "Sort_Artist" : "Kosice, Gyula", "Disp_Dimen" : "120.7 cm x 51.1 cm x 24.8 cm (47 1/2 in. x 20 1/8 in. x 9 3/4 in.)", "Disp_Height" : "120.7 cm", "Disp_Width" : "51.1 cm", "Dimen_Extent" : "HLW", "Medium" : "Plexiglas, light, motor, and water in a wooden case", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Plexiglas, light, motor, and water in a wooden case", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Science, or more specifically science fiction, has been at the heart of Gyula Kosice’s work since he co-founded the avant-garde Madí movement in Buenos Aires in 1946. At that time he was a pioneer in introducing movement into sculpture and letting the viewer manipulate the work. By the 1960s he was experimenting with modern materials like Plexiglas, neon, and electrical motors. His utopian belief in the ability of science to create new and better worlds led in the early 1970s to his project for the Hydrospatial City, an imaginary environment suspended in space where artworks are no longer necessary because the aesthetic experience has been dissolved into everyday life. Hidroluz with its modern materials is typical of the work he was making as he developed his plans for the City. The jet of water against the Plexiglas sphere creates an infinite variety of forms and a dematerialized sculptural experience. While many of Kosice’s avant-garde colleagues of the 1940s abandoned art altogether or turned to more conventional work, Kosice continued to believe in the transformative power of art and the need to create new utopian models for living. As much as a wall relief, Hidroluz can be considered a fragment of a new living environment.", "Dedication" : "Blanton Museum of Art, The University of Texas at Austin, Gift of Barbara Duncan, 1986", "Copyright_Type" : "All approved.", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "construction", "Creation_Place2" : "Argentinean", "Department" : "Latin American Art", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/1986.304.tif", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/1986.304.tif", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/1986.304.tif", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/1986.304.tif", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "1345", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 15017, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/15017", "Disp_Access_No" : "1982.188", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1980", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1980", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1980", "Disp_Title" : "Serie de llamas núm. 2, díptico [Llama Series No. 2, Diptych]", "Alt_Title" : "Llama Series No. 2, Diptych", "Obj_Title" : "Serie de llamas núm. 2, díptico [Llama Series No. 2, Diptych]", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Miguel Angel Ríos", "Sort_Artist" : "Ríos, Miguel Angel", "Disp_Dimen" : "245 cm x 243.8 cm x 8.9 cm (96 7/16 in. x 96 in. x 3 1/2 in.)", "Disp_Height" : "245 cm", "Disp_Width" : "243.8 cm", "Dimen_Extent" : "HLW", "Medium" : "Acrylic paint, modeling paste, and sand on burlap", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Acrylic paint, modeling paste, and sand on burlap", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Miguel Angel Ríos’s works reference landscapes and cultural traditions of his homeland in rural Catamarca via formal motifs of late Modernism. While living in New York City, Ríos created a monochromatic grid from highly abstracted images of the llama, an animal essential to the Andean way of life. Catamarca once formed the southernmost reach of the Inca empire, and Ríos’s llamas may evoke ancient pictograms or the patterning of local textiles made from the animal’s wool. Within the Post-Minimalist grid, the llamas also suggest a negotiation of Ríos’s identity between cultures and an implicit critique of the Eurocentric biases underlying artistic Modernism. ", "Dedication" : "Blanton Museum of Art, The University of Texas at Austin, Barbara Duncan Fund, 1982", "Copyright_Type" : "", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "painting", "Creation_Place2" : "Argentinean", "Department" : "Latin American Art", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/1982.188.tif", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/1982.188.tif", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/1982.188.tif", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/1982.188.tif", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "13146", "Image_Type" : "Digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 15020, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/15020", "Disp_Access_No" : "1982.18", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1980", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1980", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1980", "Disp_Title" : "Trilce II", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "Trilce II", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "César Paternosto", "Sort_Artist" : "Paternosto, César", "Disp_Dimen" : "166.3 cm x 166.3 cm x 10.5 cm (65 1/2 in. x 65 1/2 in. x 4 1/8 in.)", "Disp_Height" : "166.3 cm", "Disp_Width" : "166.3 cm", "Dimen_Extent" : "HLW", "Medium" : "Acrylic", "Support" : "canvas", "Disp_Medium" : "Acrylic on canvas", "Info_Page_Comm" : "César Paternosto began his career as a hard-edge geometric artist, but in the late 1970s he set out to research ancient American sources of geometrical abstraction. Traveling throughout the Andean region of northern Argentina, Peru, and Bolivia, he studied and acquired scholarly expertise about traditional textiles and Inca stonework, finding in them a source of artistic inspiration. This painting, titled in homage to Peruvian César Vallejo’s 1922 book of poetry "Trilce," exemplifies Paternosto’s artworks after his Andean travels. The four parallel lines, stacked symmetrically in the center, reference the symbolism of numbers within Andean culture, while the earthy monochrome evokes the texture of stone or sand.", "Dedication" : "Blanton Museum of Art, The University of Texas at Austin, Barbara Duncan Fund, 1982", "Copyright_Type" : "edu; promo; merch; web", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "painting", "Creation_Place2" : "Argentinean", "Department" : "Latin American Art", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/1982.18.tif", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/1982.18.tif", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/1982.18.tif", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/1982.18.tif", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "1231", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 15139, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/15139", "Disp_Access_No" : "1977.25", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1975", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1975", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1975", "Disp_Title" : "Ambiguas vecindades [Ambiguous Neighborhoods]", "Alt_Title" : "Ambiguous Neighborhoods", "Obj_Title" : "Ambiguas vecindades [Ambiguous Neighborhoods]", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Miguel Ocampo", "Sort_Artist" : "Ocampo, Miguel", "Disp_Dimen" : "127 cm x 152.5 cm (50 in. x 60 1/16 in.)", "Disp_Height" : "127 cm", "Disp_Width" : "152.5 cm", "Dimen_Extent" : "Sight", "Medium" : "Acrylic", "Support" : "canvas", "Disp_Medium" : "Acrylic on canvas", "Info_Page_Comm" : "", "Dedication" : "Blanton Museum of Art, The University of Texas at Austin, Gift of St. Joe Minerals Corporation, 1977", "Copyright_Type" : "", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "painting", "Creation_Place2" : "Argentinean", "Department" : "Latin American Art", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/1977.25.tif", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/1977.25.tif", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/1977.25.tif", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/1977.25.tif", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "8867", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 16832, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/16832", "Disp_Access_No" : "2003.74", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "circa 1938", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1933", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1943", "Disp_Title" : "Composición", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "Composición", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Esteban Lisa", "Sort_Artist" : "Lisa, Esteban", "Disp_Dimen" : "26.4 cm x 19.7 cm (10 3/8 in. x 7 3/4 in.)", "Disp_Height" : "26.4 cm", "Disp_Width" : "19.7 cm", "Dimen_Extent" : "sheet", "Medium" : "Oil", "Support" : "cardboard", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on cardboard", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Esteban Lisa was a pioneer of abstraction in Argentina, although he chose not to exhibit or sell his art. He believed art making was a spiritual, ethical, and philosophical endeavor and considered art and science to be intimately related. He found in abstraction a means to communicate a subjective vision of the cosmos. In the early 1940s, Lisa played with dynamic contrasts of geometric and organic forms, solid and patterned areas, as well as light and dark tones. His muted color palette evokes the hues of the natural world. ", "Dedication" : "Blanton Museum of Art, The University of Texas at Austin, Gift of Fundación Esteban Lisa in honor of Dr. Gabriel Pérez-Barreiro, 2003", "Copyright_Type" : "", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "painting", "Creation_Place2" : "Argentinean", "Department" : "Prints and Drawings; Latin American Art", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/2003.74_recto.tif", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/2003.74_recto.tif", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/2003.74_recto.tif", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/2003.74_recto.tif", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "1127", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/2003.74_verso.tif", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/2003.74_verso.tif", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/2003.74_verso.tif", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/2003.74_verso.tif", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "2138", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 16910, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/16910", "Disp_Access_No" : "2003.107", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1993", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1993", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1993", "Disp_Title" : "Esfera (Serie desequilibrios) 1-I [Sphere (Imbalance Series) 1-I]", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "Esfera (Serie desequilibrios) 1-I [Sphere (Imbalance Series) 1-I]", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Víctor Grippo", "Sort_Artist" : "Grippo, Víctor", "Disp_Dimen" : "44.1 cm x 34.3 cm x 11.6 cm (17 3/8 in. x 13 1/2 in. x 4 9/16 in.)", "Disp_Height" : "44.1 cm", "Disp_Width" : "34.3 cm", "Dimen_Extent" : "HWD", "Medium" : "Glazed wooden box, plaster and paint ", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Glazed wooden box, plaster and paint ", "Info_Page_Comm" : "In the 1980’s, Victor Grippo created a series of stage set-like sculptures called “Balance” that featured small scenes illustrating physical acts of cause and effect. He followed it with a complementary series called “Imbalance” that includes “Esfera.” On the left side a red ball rests on a shelf next to a shattered white crucible. An unbroken crucible rests next to the shards, painted above it is red and black circle. Grippo’s puzzling tableau contrasts real objects with their two-dimensional images and unsettles scientific rules that connect cause with its possible effects. ", "Dedication" : "Blanton Museum of Art, The University of Texas at Austin, Purchase, 2003", "Copyright_Type" : "", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "sculpture", "Creation_Place2" : "Argentinean", "Department" : "Latin American Art", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/2003.107.tif", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/2003.107.tif", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/2003.107.tif", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/2003.107.tif", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "2104", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 17177, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/17177", "Disp_Access_No" : "2004.129.1/3-3/3", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1974", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1974", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1974", "Disp_Title" : "Pintura abstracta: Rust, Gold, Black", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "Pintura abstracta: Rust, Gold, Black", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "César Paternosto", "Sort_Artist" : "Paternosto, César", "Disp_Dimen" : "107.9 cm x 106.7 cm (42 1/2 in. x 42 in.)", "Disp_Height" : "107.9 cm", "Disp_Width" : "106.7 cm", "Dimen_Extent" : "installed dimension", "Medium" : "Acrylic", "Support" : "canvas", "Disp_Medium" : "Acrylic on canvas", "Info_Page_Comm" : "In 1970, soon after moving to New York from Buenos Aires, César Paternosto began a series of paintings in which he explored, literally, the limits of the painted surface by leaving the front of the canvas white and painting forms on the edge of the stretcher. These works were a synthesis of earlier Argentine explorations into the sculptural possibilities of painting (by the Madí group in the 1940s) and more recent American developments in Minimalism. By 1974 he was making multipart paintings, such as Pintura abstracta, in which the white wall between the panels further complicates the physical and sculptural presence of the work. To look at this work, the viewer has to physically move around it, reconstructing a composition that cannot be seen from a single viewpoint. Although responding to Minimalism, Paternosto was also making a claim for the continued relevance of painting by rejecting the industrial materials favored by his American peers. Pintura abstracta was one of Paternosto’s last paintings in this stark style; when a 1977 trip to Peru and Bolivia opened his eyes to a more ancient tradition of abstract art in Inca stonework and textiles, he embarked on a long and fruitful investigation into the pre-Columbian sources of abstraction.", "Dedication" : "Blanton Museum of Art, The University of Texas at Austin, Gift of Cecilia Buzio de Torres, 2004", "Copyright_Type" : "All", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "painting", "Creation_Place2" : "Argentinean", "Department" : "Latin American Art", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/2004.129.1-3_3-3.tif", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/2004.129.1-3_3-3.tif", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/2004.129.1-3_3-3.tif", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/2004.129.1-3_3-3.tif", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "2179", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/2004.129.1-3_3-3_detail_Info.tif", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/2004.129.1-3_3-3_detail_Info.tif", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/2004.129.1-3_3-3_detail_Info.tif", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/2004.129.1-3_3-3_detail_Info.tif", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "2180", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/2004.129.1-3_3-3_detail_left.tif", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/2004.129.1-3_3-3_detail_left.tif", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/2004.129.1-3_3-3_detail_left.tif", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/2004.129.1-3_3-3_detail_left.tif", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "2181", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/2004.129.1-3_3-3 _detail_right.tif", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/2004.129.1-3_3-3 _detail_right.tif", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/2004.129.1-3_3-3 _detail_right.tif", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/2004.129.1-3_3-3 _detail_right.tif", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "2182", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 17584, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/17584", "Disp_Access_No" : "2005.154.1/3-3/3", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1966", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1966", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1966", "Disp_Title" : "Estructura (3 panels)", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "Estructura (3 panels)", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Alejandro Puente", "Sort_Artist" : "Puente, Alejandro", "Disp_Dimen" : "190 cm x 160 cm x 200 cm (74 13/16 in. x 63 in. x 78 3/4 in.)", "Disp_Height" : "190 cm", "Disp_Width" : "160 cm", "Dimen_Extent" : "installed dimension", "Medium" : "Oil", "Support" : "canvas", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on canvas", "Info_Page_Comm" : "", "Dedication" : "Blanton Museum of Art, The University of Texas at Austin, Purchase as a gift of Margaret McDermott in honor of Barbara Duncan, and Judy S. and Charles W. Tate, 2005", "Copyright_Type" : "", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "painting", "Creation_Place2" : "Argentinean", "Department" : "Latin American Art", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/2005.154.1-3_3-3.TIF", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/2005.154.1-3_3-3.TIF", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/2005.154.1-3_3-3.TIF", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/2005.154.1-3_3-3.TIF", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "10023", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 18820, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/18820", "Disp_Access_No" : "2007.22", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1950", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1950", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1950", "Disp_Title" : "Obra articulada y móvil en bronce [Articulated and Mobile Work in Bronze]", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "Obra articulada y móvil en bronce [Articulated and Mobile Work in Bronze]", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Gyula Kosice", "Sort_Artist" : "Kosice, Gyula", "Disp_Dimen" : "73 cm x 35 cm x 25 cm (28 3/4 in. x 13 3/4 in. x 9 13/16 in.)", "Disp_Height" : "73 cm", "Disp_Width" : "35 cm", "Dimen_Extent" : "HWD", "Medium" : "Bronze", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Bronze", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Gyula Kosice was a pioneer of Concrete and Kinetic art. In the late 1940s, he co-founded Madí, whose experimental approach led him to use unorthodox materials, such as metal slats, neon lights, and Plexiglas. He wanted to engage the public in playful and dynamic ways. For example, "Obra articulada y móvil en bronce" has no predetermined shape. The flat bronze slats are riveted at joints so they can be pivoted in various directions, thereby generating any number of potential forms.", "Dedication" : "Blanton Museum of Art, The University of Texas at Austin, Gift of the artist, 2007", "Copyright_Type" : "edu; promo; merch; web", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "sculpture", "Creation_Place2" : "Argentinean", "Department" : "Latin American Art", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/2007.22-2.tif", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/2007.22-2.tif", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/2007.22-2.tif", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/2007.22-2.tif", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "12913", "Image_Type" : "Digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/2007.22-1.tif", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/2007.22-1.tif", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/2007.22-1.tif", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/2007.22-1.tif", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "12912", "Image_Type" : "Digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/2007.22-3.tif", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/2007.22-3.tif", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/2007.22-3.tif", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/2007.22-3.tif", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "12914", "Image_Type" : "Digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 20416, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/20416", "Disp_Access_No" : "2016.88", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1958", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1958", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1958", "Disp_Title" : "Desmaterialización II [Dematerialization II]", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "Desmaterialización II [Dematerialization II]", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Julián Althabe", "Sort_Artist" : "Althabe, Julián", "Disp_Dimen" : "57.8 cm x 40.6 cm x 61 cm (22 3/4 in. x 16 in. x 24 in.)", "Disp_Height" : "57.8 cm", "Disp_Width" : "40.6 cm", "Dimen_Extent" : "HWD", "Medium" : "String and wire with black paint", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "String and wire with black paint", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Julián Althabe became interested in abstraction in the 1950s. He was especially curious about the concept of the fourth dimension, a popular scientific subject that inspired many modern artists to explore spatial realities existing beyond perception. In "Escultura," Althabe interlocks two sets of winglikeshapes made with string and wire. The internal rhythms of the triangular frames suggest that their rotation takes place simultaneously along vertical and horizontal axes in an invisible dimension. Althabe’s early interest in science and virtual movement made him a pioneer of Kinetic art in Argentina.", "Dedication" : "Blanton Museum of Art, The University of Texas at Austin, Gift of Judy S. and Charles W. Tate, 2016", "Copyright_Type" : "", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "sculpture", "Creation_Place2" : "Argentinean", "Department" : "Latin American Art", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ ] },{ "embark_ID" : 20427, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/20427", "Disp_Access_No" : "2016.94", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1947", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1947", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1947", "Disp_Title" : "Sin título [Untitled]", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "Sin título [Untitled]", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Martín Blaszko", "Sort_Artist" : "Blaszko, Martín", "Disp_Dimen" : "41.4 cm x 34.3 cm (16 5/16 in. x 13 1/2 in.)", "Disp_Height" : "41.4 cm", "Disp_Width" : "34.3 cm", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Oil on cardboard", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on cardboard", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Madí artists were among the first to make shaped canvases that echoed the composition, rather than allow the standard rectangle frame to determine its form. Martín Blaszko’s untitled painting is a prime example. The shape of the polygonal frame follows the dynamic rhythm of crisscrossing diagonals, contrasting colors, and playful patterns. Using the classical system of proportion called the Golden Section, Blaszko delighted in balancing opposing forces and creating a sense of visual harmony. ", "Dedication" : "Blanton Museum of Art, The University of Texas at Austin, Gift of Judy S. and Charles W. Tate, 2016", "Copyright_Type" : "", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "painting", "Creation_Place2" : "Argentinean", "Department" : "Latin American Art", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ ] },{ "embark_ID" : 20443, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/20443", "Disp_Access_No" : "2016.99", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1963", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1963", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1963", "Disp_Title" : "La edad de la razón [The Age of Reason]", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "La edad de la razón [The Age of Reason]", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Ernesto Deira", "Sort_Artist" : "Deira, Ernesto", "Disp_Dimen" : "129.7 cm x 195 cm (51 1/16 in. x 76 3/4 in.)", "Disp_Height" : "129.7 cm", "Disp_Width" : "195 cm", "Dimen_Extent" : "sight", "Medium" : "Enamel on canvas", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Enamel on canvas", "Info_Page_Comm" : "During the 1960s, Ernesto Deira often titled his works after his literary, philosophical, and political concerns. This painting shares its title with the first volume of Jean-Paul Sartre’s trilogy "The Roads to Freedom," a masterpiece of existentialist writing. The influence of Sartre’s Marxist-inspired existentialism in Argentina was profound. Here Deira meditates on human existence through visual means. His figures are built through layered splashes, thick brushstrokes, and dripping colors that do little to solidify their substance. These presences remain open, conflicted and undefined, as they oscillate between the spectral and the grotesque.", "Dedication" : "Blanton Museum of Art, The University of Texas at Austin, Gift of Judy S. and Charles W. Tate, 2016", "Copyright_Type" : "", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "painting", "Creation_Place2" : "Argentinean", "Department" : "Latin American Art", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ ] },{ "embark_ID" : 20444, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/20444", "Disp_Access_No" : "2016.100", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1937", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1937", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1937", "Disp_Title" : "Composición [Composition]", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "Composición [Composition]", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Juan Del Prete", "Sort_Artist" : "Del Prete, Juan", "Disp_Dimen" : "31.8 cm x 19.8 cm (12 1/2 in. x 7 13/16 in.)", "Disp_Height" : "31.8 cm", "Disp_Width" : "19.8 cm", "Dimen_Extent" : "sight", "Medium" : "Oil", "Support" : "board", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on board", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Composed of flat, geometric planes of color that overlap and intersect, this painting by Juan Del Prete predicts the hard-edge brand of geometric abstraction that would come to dominate Argentine art in the 1940s. Though Del Prete was a pioneer of geometric abstraction in Latin America, his brushwork often betrayed a more expressive sensibility. The painterly texture of "Composición," with its uneven line, warm palette, and gentle gradations in tone, lends the composition an unusual intimacy.", "Dedication" : "Blanton Museum of Art, The University of Texas at Austin, Gift of Judy S. and Charles W. Tate, 2016", "Copyright_Type" : "", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "painting", "Creation_Place2" : "Argentinean", "Department" : "Latin American Art", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ ] },{ "embark_ID" : 20469, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/20469", "Disp_Access_No" : "2016.105", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1949", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1949", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1949", "Disp_Title" : "Formas en el plano [Forms on the Plane]", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "Formas en el plano [Forms on the Plane]", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Alfredo Hlito", "Sort_Artist" : "Hlito, Alfredo", "Disp_Dimen" : "80 cm x 60 cm (31 1/2 in. x 23 5/8 in.)", "Disp_Height" : "80 cm", "Disp_Width" : "60 cm", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Oil", "Support" : "canvas", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on canvas", "Info_Page_Comm" : "A cofounder of the Association of Concrete Art and Invention, Alfredo Hlito synthesized his interests in abstraction and Marxism. Many leftist artists favored social realism. Hlito, however, believed figurative art was deceptive and illusionism interfered with the perception of reality. He advocated instead an art made of concrete plastic elements such as color, line, and form. In this painting, Hlito generates a sense of visual harmony through simple curves in complementary red and green. While members of the Association valued precision, his approach to geometry is intuitive and never exact. ", "Dedication" : "Blanton Museum of Art, The University of Texas at Austin, Gift of Judy S. and Charles W. Tate, 2016", "Copyright_Type" : "", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "painting", "Creation_Place2" : "Argentinean", "Department" : "Latin American Art", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/2016.105.tif", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/2016.105.tif", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/2016.105.tif", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/2016.105.tif", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "15818", "Image_Type" : "Digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 20470, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/20470", "Disp_Access_No" : "2016.106", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "circa 1950", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1945", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1955", "Disp_Title" : "Línea continua [Continuous Line]", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "Línea continua [Continuous Line]", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Enio Iommi", "Sort_Artist" : "Iommi, Enio", "Disp_Dimen" : "24.4 cm x 29.8 cm x 29.8 cm (9 5/8 in. x 11 3/4 in. x 11 3/4 in.)", "Disp_Height" : "24.4 cm", "Disp_Width" : "29.8 cm", "Dimen_Extent" : "HWD", "Medium" : "Stainless steel", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Stainless steel", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Enio Iommi joined the Association of Concrete Art and Invention as a teenager and participated in its activities until the group dissolved in 1950. "Línea continua" exemplifies three key aspects of Iommi’s work: the rational approach to geometry promoted by the Association, a fascination with shaping space, and the use of newly available industrial materials. Here Iommi made a loose knot from stainless steel rod to convey the sense of an endless Möbius strip moving through three-dimensional space.", "Dedication" : "Blanton Museum of Art, The University of Texas at Austin, Gift of Judy S. and Charles W. Tate, 2016", "Copyright_Type" : "", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "sculpture", "Creation_Place2" : "Argentinean", "Department" : "Latin American Art", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ ] },{ "embark_ID" : 20477, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/20477", "Disp_Access_No" : "2019.106.a-?", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1966", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1966", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1966", "Disp_Title" : "Continuel Mobile [Continual Mobile]", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "Continuel Mobile [Continual Mobile]", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Julio Le Parc", "Sort_Artist" : "Le Parc, Julio", "Disp_Dimen" : "98.4 cm x 40 cm x 8.3 cm (38 3/4 in. x 15 3/4 in. x 3 1/4 in.)", "Disp_Height" : "98.4 cm", "Disp_Width" : "40 cm", "Dimen_Extent" : "HWD", "Medium" : "Aluminum and color acetate with cloth, cardboard, and fishing wire on wood", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Aluminum and color acetate with cloth, cardboard, and fishing wire on wood", "Info_Page_Comm" : "", "Dedication" : "Blanton Museum of Art, The University of Texas at Austin, Gift of Judy S. and Charles W. Tate, 2019", "Copyright_Type" : "", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "construction", "Creation_Place2" : "Argentinean", "Department" : "Latin American Art", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ ] },{ "embark_ID" : 25665, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/25665", "Disp_Access_No" : "2017.209.2", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1976", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1976", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1976", "Disp_Title" : "Tape Project, Akron Art Institute", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "Tape Project, Akron Art Institute", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Jaime Davidovich", "Sort_Artist" : "Davidovich, Jaime", "Disp_Dimen" : "", "Disp_Height" : "", "Disp_Width" : "", "Dimen_Extent" : "dimensions variable", "Medium" : "Clear tape", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Clear tape", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Jaime Davidovich first began exploring texture in his early monochromatic works. He later experimented with the real and conceptual boundaries of his paintings by eliminating their frames and taping them directly to the wall. By the early 1970s, he worked specifically with adhesive tape, placing it on walls, floors, stairways, sidewalks, and TV monitors. Through these creative actions and interventions, he expanded the spaces where art could be displayed. "Tape Project, Akron Art Institute," which originally took place in Ohio, is one of Davidovich’s first tape installations. The clear tape highlights imperfections of the wall and the mode of installation results in an uneven surface marked with bubbles, folds, and wrinkles. Davidovich made the conceptual leap from actual tape to video tape, becoming an early innovator in video art and in using public television as a platform for performance.", "Dedication" : "Blanton Museum of Art, The University of Texas at Austin, Gift of Dario Werthein under the Acquisition Programs for Museums of ArteBA Foundation, 2017", "Copyright_Type" : "", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "installation", "Creation_Place2" : "Argentinean", "Department" : "Prints and Drawings; Latin American Art", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/2017.209.2-detail-1.tif", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/2017.209.2-detail-1.tif", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/2017.209.2-detail-1.tif", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/2017.209.2-detail-1.tif", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "21751", "Image_Type" : "Digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/2017.209.2-detail-2.tif", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/2017.209.2-detail-2.tif", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/2017.209.2-detail-2.tif", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/2017.209.2-detail-2.tif", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "21752", "Image_Type" : "Digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/2017.209.2-detail-3.tif", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/2017.209.2-detail-3.tif", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/2017.209.2-detail-3.tif", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/2017.209.2-detail-3.tif", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "21753", "Image_Type" : "Digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/2017.209.2-overall.tif", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/2017.209.2-overall.tif", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/2017.209.2-overall.tif", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/2017.209.2-overall.tif", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "21754", "Image_Type" : "Digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] }, ] }