{ "objects" : [ { "embark_ID" : 13887, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/13887", "Disp_Access_No" : "P1975.25.1", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1973", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1973", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1973", "Disp_Title" : "No. 415 [Núm. 415]", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "No. 415 [Núm. 415]", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Sérgio de Camargo", "Sort_Artist" : "Camargo, Sérgio de", "Disp_Dimen" : "19.6 cm x 18.1 cm x 10.5 cm (7 11/16 in. x 7 1/8 in. x 4 1/8 in.)", "Disp_Height" : "19.6 cm", "Disp_Width" : "18.1 cm", "Dimen_Extent" : "HLW", "Medium" : "White Carrara marble", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "White Carrara marble", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Sérgio de Camargo explored the rhythmic abstract geometry favored by the proponents of Kinetic and Op art that he met while living in Paris during the 1960s and 1970s. "No. 415" is an assemblage of marble blocks of various sizes cut at different angles. By playfully alternating flat areas with triangular wedges, Camargo produced changing patterns of light and shadows. The cohesive organic quality and dynamic geometry of this sculpture lend it a monumental presence.", "Dedication" : "Blanton Museum of Art, The University of Texas at Austin, Archer M. Huntington Museum Fund, 1975", "Copyright_Type" : "", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "sculpture", "Creation_Place2" : "Brazilian", "Department" : "Latin American Art", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/P1975.25.1.tif", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/P1975.25.1.tif", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/P1975.25.1.tif", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/P1975.25.1.tif", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "5187", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 14037, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/14037", "Disp_Access_No" : "G1975.22.1", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1973", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1973", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1973", "Disp_Title" : "Sozinho em verde [Alone in Green]", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "Sozinho em verde [Alone in Green]", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Antonio Henrique Amaral", "Sort_Artist" : "Amaral, Antonio Henrique", "Disp_Dimen" : "151 cm x 150 cm (59 7/16 in. x 59 1/16 in.)", "Disp_Height" : "151 cm", "Disp_Width" : "150 cm", "Dimen_Extent" : "Canvas", "Medium" : "Oil", "Support" : "canvas", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on canvas", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Following the 1968 military coup in Brazil, many artists left that country for New York. Antonio Henrique Amaral, who arrived in 1973, become one of the most successful of those artists, both critically and commercially, earning fame with his iconic images of bananas. Critics have read Alone in Green, with its overripe, tied, and bruised banana, as a metaphor for political violence and torture, pointing out that the vertical prongs of the fork in the upper half of the painting recall prison bars. But the predominant yellow and green colors of the painting are the same as those of the Brazilian flag, meaning the banana can also be interpreted as an ironic comment on the popular perception of Brazil as an idyllic tropical paradise. Like many Latin American artists of the 1970s, Amaral heavily coded his denunciation of a cruel political system by subverting the stereotypes that dominate international perceptions of Latin American culture. Amaral’s deadpan realistic style shows links to contemporary American Pop art, yet his political double-meanings and his emphasis on the banana’s vulnerability suggest a world far removed from a straightforward fascination with consumer society.", "Dedication" : "Blanton Museum of Art, The University of Texas at Austin, Gift of Barbara Duncan, 1975", "Copyright_Type" : "All", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "painting", "Creation_Place2" : "Brazilian", "Department" : "Latin American Art", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/G1975.22.1.tif", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/G1975.22.1.tif", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/G1975.22.1.tif", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/G1975.22.1.tif", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "2450", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 14287, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/14287", "Disp_Access_No" : "2000.92", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1983", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1983", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1983", "Disp_Title" : "Masterpieces (In Absentia): Marcel Duchamp", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "Masterpieces (In Absentia): Marcel Duchamp", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Regina Silveira", "Sort_Artist" : "Silveira, Regina", "Disp_Dimen" : "96.52 cm x 421.64 cm (38 in. x 166 in.)", "Disp_Height" : "96.52 cm", "Disp_Width" : "421.64 cm", "Dimen_Extent" : "floor space, installed", "Medium" : "Digital image, printed as self-adhesive vinyl cutout, and wood pedestal", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Digital image, printed as self-adhesive vinyl cutout, and wood pedestal", "Info_Page_Comm" : "In the late 1970s, Regina Silveira became interested in 15th-century treaties on perspective and especially intrigued by anamorphosis (the controlled distortion of images that could be made to appear normal when viewed from a particular perspective). She produced a series of works where she used the anamorphic distortions of objects from everyday life—chairs, hammers, nails, motorcycles, bookshelves—to create ominous shadows made of adhesive vinyl. In the 1980s, she began to use seminal works from the canon of Western art history as a point of departure. “Masterpieces (In Absentia)” depicts the elongated shadow of a famous “readymade” sculpture of a bicycle wheel on a stool by Marcel Duchamp. In this work, the border between absence and presence, the real and the dematerialized, the original and the copy becomes indistinguishable. The shadow, liberated from its origin, represents the legacy of Western modernism as it looms large over Brazil and the ways Brazilian artists have consumed and transfigured that tradition.", "Dedication" : "Blanton Museum of Art, The University of Texas at Austin, Purchase through the Archer M. Huntington Museum Fund, 2000", "Copyright_Type" : "edu; promo; merch; web", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "installation", "Creation_Place2" : "Brazilian", "Department" : "Latin American Art", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/2000.92.tif", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/2000.92.tif", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/2000.92.tif", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/2000.92.tif", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "3473", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/2000.92.tif", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/2000.92.tif", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/2000.92.tif", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/2000.92.tif", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "3476", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/2000.92-2019_3.tif", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/2000.92-2019_3.tif", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/2000.92-2019_3.tif", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/2000.92-2019_3.tif", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "19606", "Image_Type" : "Digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/2000.92-2019_2.tif", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/2000.92-2019_2.tif", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/2000.92-2019_2.tif", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/2000.92-2019_2.tif", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "19605", "Image_Type" : "Digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/2000.92-2019_1.tif", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/2000.92-2019_1.tif", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/2000.92-2019_1.tif", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/2000.92-2019_1.tif", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "19604", "Image_Type" : "Digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 14341, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/14341", "Disp_Access_No" : "1998.76", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1987", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1987", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1987", "Disp_Title" : "Missão/Missões [Mission/Missions] (How to Build Cathedrals)", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "Missão/Missões [Mission/Missions] (How to Build Cathedrals)", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Cildo Meireles", "Sort_Artist" : "Meireles, Cildo", "Disp_Dimen" : "249.94 cm x 345.95 cm x 345.95 cm (98 3/8 in. x 136 3/16 in. x 136 3/16 in.)", "Disp_Height" : "249.94 cm", "Disp_Width" : "345.95 cm", "Dimen_Extent" : "varies with installation", "Medium" : "600,000 coins, 800 communion wafers, 2000 cattle bones, 80 paving stones, and black cloth", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "600,000 coins, 800 communion wafers, 2,000 cattle bones, 80 paving stones, and black cloth", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Cildo Meireles’s installation was first commissioned for an exhibition about the history of the Jesuits in southern Brazil. The artist created a contemplative space that functions as a critique of Jesuit missions established during colonial times to contain the indigenous Tupi-Guaraní people and convert them to Catholicism. The work’s symbolic elements reveal the complicit relationship between material power (coins), spiritual power (communion wafers), and tragedy (bones), while the black shroud and overhead lighting evoke ideas of life and death. Meireles’ use of cattle bones references the importance of ranching within the region’s colonial economy. Yet the bones’ physical resemblance to the human femur also alludes to the human losses associated with forced acculturation. ", "Dedication" : "Blanton Museum of Art, The University of Texas at Austin, Gift of the Peter Norton Family Foundation, 1998", "Copyright_Type" : "edu; promo; web", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "installation", "Creation_Place2" : "Brazilian", "Department" : "Latin American Art", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/1998.76.tif", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/1998.76.tif", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/1998.76.tif", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/1998.76.tif", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "1696", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/1998.76_detail.tif", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/1998.76_detail.tif", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/1998.76_detail.tif", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/1998.76_detail.tif", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "1697", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/1998.76 detail b.tif", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/1998.76 detail b.tif", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/1998.76 detail b.tif", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/1998.76 detail b.tif", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "4477", "Image_Type" : "Digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/1998.76 detail c.tif", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/1998.76 detail c.tif", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/1998.76 detail c.tif", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/1998.76 detail c.tif", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "4478", "Image_Type" : "Digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/1998.76_detail_d.tif", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/1998.76_detail_d.tif", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/1998.76_detail_d.tif", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/1998.76_detail_d.tif", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "9093", "Image_Type" : "Digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/1998.76_2017-1.tif", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/1998.76_2017-1.tif", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/1998.76_2017-1.tif", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/1998.76_2017-1.tif", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "15804", "Image_Type" : "Digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/1998.76_2017-2.tif", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/1998.76_2017-2.tif", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/1998.76_2017-2.tif", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/1998.76_2017-2.tif", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "15805", "Image_Type" : "Digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/1998.76-2017-straight.tif", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/1998.76-2017-straight.tif", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/1998.76-2017-straight.tif", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/1998.76-2017-straight.tif", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "22497", "Image_Type" : "Digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 15119, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/15119", "Disp_Access_No" : "1978.1", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1976", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1976", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1976", "Disp_Title" : "Andamento [Walking]", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "Andamento [Walking]", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Iberê Camargo", "Sort_Artist" : "Camargo, Iberê", "Disp_Dimen" : "130 cm x 184 cm (51 3/16 in. x 72 7/16 in.)", "Disp_Height" : "130 cm", "Disp_Width" : "184 cm", "Dimen_Extent" : "Sight", "Medium" : "Oil", "Support" : "canvas", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on canvas", "Info_Page_Comm" : "", "Dedication" : "Blanton Museum of Art, The University of Texas at Austin, Archer M. Huntington Museum Fund, 1978", "Copyright_Type" : "", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "painting", "Creation_Place2" : "Brazilian", "Department" : "Latin American Art", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/1978.1.tif", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/1978.1.tif", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/1978.1.tif", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/1978.1.tif", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "1167", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 20435, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/20435", "Disp_Access_No" : "2016.96", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1952", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1952", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1952", "Disp_Title" : "Sem título [Untitled]", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "Sem título [Untitled]", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Willys de Castro", "Sort_Artist" : "Castro, Willys de", "Disp_Dimen" : "66.4 cm x 59.7 cm (26 1/8 in. x 23 1/2 in.)", "Disp_Height" : "66.4 cm", "Disp_Width" : "59.7 cm", "Dimen_Extent" : "sight", "Medium" : "Oil on wood", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on wood", "Info_Page_Comm" : "The emergence of the Concrete art movements in Brazil in the early 1950s encouraged artists like Willys de Castro, a graphic and theater designer active in São Paulo, to experiment with geometric abstraction. Here Castro avoids the mathematical rigor favored by concrete artists in order to play freely with form and color, which resulted in the creation of a more fluid sense of space. The lighter, neutral tones in the center of this painting suggest depth, while the darker, interlocking shapes anchored in each corner emphasize the flatness of the plane. This preoccupation with the ambiguity of perception became a key aspect in Castro’s later production.", "Dedication" : "Blanton Museum of Art, The University of Texas at Austin, Gift of Judy S. and Charles W. Tate, 2016", "Copyright_Type" : "", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "painting", "Creation_Place2" : "Brazilian", "Department" : "Latin American Art", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/2016.96-frame.tif", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/2016.96-frame.tif", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/2016.96-frame.tif", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/2016.96-frame.tif", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "14281", "Image_Type" : "Digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 20436, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/20436", "Disp_Access_No" : "2016.97", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1977–83", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "", "_Disp_End_Date" : "", "Disp_Title" : "Pluriobjeto [Pluriobject]", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "Pluriobjeto [Pluriobject]", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Willys de Castro", "Sort_Artist" : "Castro, Willys de", "Disp_Dimen" : "199.4 x 5.1 x 14.6 cm (78 1/2 x 2 x 5 3/4 in.)", "Disp_Height" : "199.4 cm", "Disp_Width" : "5.1 cm", "Dimen_Extent" : "HWD", "Medium" : "Chromed iron, oxidized iron and anodized matte aluminum", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Chromed iron, oxidized iron and anodized matte aluminum", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Willys de Castro combined his experience as a concrete artist and designer to create artworks that invite a more active participation of the viewer. "Pluriobjeto" exists in an in-between space: Its minimal, interlocking shapes made with industrial materials lay flat against the wall. Only after viewers engage in closer examination of the work do they see how the object reaches into the space of the gallery. This hybrid of painting and sculpture challenges the separation between virtual and real space.", "Dedication" : "Blanton Museum of Art, The University of Texas at Austin, Gift of Judy S. and Charles W. Tate, 2016", "Copyright_Type" : "", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "sculpture", "Creation_Place2" : "Brazilian", "Department" : "Latin American Art", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/2016.97-rightside.tif", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/2016.97-rightside.tif", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/2016.97-rightside.tif", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/2016.97-rightside.tif", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "14283", "Image_Type" : "Digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 21092, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/21092", "Disp_Access_No" : "2016.39", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "2005", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "2005", "_Disp_End_Date" : "2005", "Disp_Title" : "Bestiário [Bestiary]", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "Bestiário [Bestiary]", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Lais Myrrha", "Sort_Artist" : "Myrrha, Lais", "Disp_Dimen" : "", "Disp_Height" : "", "Disp_Width" : "", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Single channel video", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Single channel video", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Lais Myrrah combines in “Bestiário” seven editions of the national news program “Journal Nacional” on the Rede lobo TV network, which appear simultaneously, coinciding only at the moment when. The anchors state in unison “Agora, no Jornal Nacional!” [Now, the National News!]. The video obscures the information being transmitted, while showing how the news is, in the artist’s words, “constructed, formatted, and manipulated in order to compose a homogenized frame.” In revealing how television news becomes a biased blend of reality and myth, “Bestiário” operates like a contemporary counterpart to medieval compendiums that featured natural and mythical beasts. Given the central tole that the media- and the “Jornal Nacional in particular- has played during political crises in recent Brazilian history, “Bestiário” offers a timely examination of the inability of the news to operate outside the spectacle of the mass media, obscuring rather than clarifying the ongoing scandals and power struggles in Brazil.", "Dedication" : "Blanton Museum of Art, The University of Texas at Austin, Gift of Antonio C. La Pastina and Dale A. Rice, 2016", "Copyright_Type" : "", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "time based media", "Creation_Place2" : "Brazilian", "Department" : "Latin American Art", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ ] },{ "embark_ID" : 21284, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/21284", "Disp_Access_No" : "2016.130", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1988", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1988", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1988", "Disp_Title" : "Untitled", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Frida Baranek", "Sort_Artist" : "Baranek, Frida", "Disp_Dimen" : "300 x 200 x 200 cm (118 1/8 x 78 3/4 x 78 3/4 in.)", "Disp_Height" : "300 cm", "Disp_Width" : "200 cm", "Dimen_Extent" : "overall", "Medium" : "Oxidized wire and metal sheets", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Oxidized wire and metal sheets", "Info_Page_Comm" : "In her series “Air Drawings”, Frida Baranek uses discarded industrial materials, such as rusted wire and metal sheets, that appear to be salvaged from demolition sites. At the same time, the cloud-like configuration of the work suggests natural phenomena, like swirling dust devils or even fragile nests. 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Catunda’s “drops,” a recurring element in her art, are made with heavy plastic sheeting sewn on top of shaped and painted canvas. She states, “I am interested in images that are already in the world, with which I can interfere. And that is directly linked to the idea of appropriation of pictures and objects, or the meanings of the things that I bring to the work, are constantly changing, transforming themselves, varying all the time.”", "Dedication" : "Blanton Museum of Art, The University of Texas at Austin, Gift of Patricia Phelps de Cisneros in honor of Ellen Susman, 2018", "Copyright_Type" : "", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "sculpture", "Creation_Place2" : "Brazilian", "Department" : "Latin American Art", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/2018.94-install.tif", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/2018.94-install.tif", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/2018.94-install.tif", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/2018.94-install.tif", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "22764", "Image_Type" : "Digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] }, ] }