{ "objects" : [ { "embark_ID" : 14897, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/14897", "Disp_Access_No" : "1984.57", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "circa 1650-1655", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1650", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1655", "Disp_Title" : "Personification of Astrology", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "Personification of Astrology", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Guercino (Giovanni Francesco Barbieri)", "Sort_Artist" : "Guercino (Giovanni Francesco Barbieri)", "Disp_Dimen" : "81 cm x 65.6 cm (31 7/8 in. x 25 13/16 in.)", "Disp_Height" : "81 cm", "Disp_Width" : "65.6 cm", "Dimen_Extent" : "Canvas", "Medium" : "Oil", "Support" : "canvas", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on canvas", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Guercino, the leading artist in Bologna during the mid-seventeenth century, simplified Cesare Ripa’s description of Astrology. Ripa describes her as a science “devoted to the contemplation of the celestial bodies,” wearing blue clothing and a starry cap. Guercino gives her these attributes but omits others mentioned in Ripa: her wings, a celestial globe, compass, and scepter. Instead, he paints her looking at a demonstrational armillary sphere with Earth at its center. The sphere consists of metal rings that represent the equator, tropics, arctic, and Antarctic circles, revolving on an axis. It is notable that Guercino spotlights this geocentric device rather than a heliocentric one about two decades after Galileo’s "Dialogue Concerning the Two Great World Systems" (1632) confirmed Copernicus’s theory that the earth revolved around the sun. ", "Dedication" : "Blanton Museum of Art, The University of Texas at Austin, Archer M. Huntington Museum Fund, 1984", "Copyright_Type" : "public domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "painting", "Creation_Place2" : "Italian", "Department" : "European Paintings", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "Does this have a "twin" somewhere? (FC:jb 4/2/15)", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/1984.57.tif", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/1984.57.tif", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/1984.57.tif", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/1984.57.tif", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "1302", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 16179, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/16179", "Disp_Access_No" : "2017.1168", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "circa 1616-1617", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1616", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1617", "Disp_Title" : "Landscape with Tobias and the Angel", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "Landscape with Tobias and the Angel", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Guercino (Giovanni Francesco Barbieri)", "Sort_Artist" : "Guercino (Giovanni Francesco Barbieri)", "Disp_Dimen" : "31 cm x 40.5 cm (12 3/16 in. x 15 15/16 in.)", "Disp_Height" : "31 cm", "Disp_Width" : "40.5 cm", "Dimen_Extent" : "canvas", "Medium" : "Oil", "Support" : "copper", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on copper", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Archangel Raphael points to a great fish located at the painting’s bottom edge and instructs a surprised, bathing Tobias to seize it. Tobias, the son of the title character in the Book of Tobit, would later use the fish’s entrails to cure the blindness of his father and to dispel a demon tormenting his future wife, Sara. Guercino was a leading painter in the Bolognese school of the seventeenth century. He was known for his ability to communicate emotion through human gesture and expression. His talent for depicting contrasts in light also appears in the painting’s dark landscape lit by a setting sun, which echoes Tobias’ story of faith and revelation. This rare work is likely Guercino’s only landscape painting on copper to incorporate a religious narrative. ", "Dedication" : "Blanton Museum of Art, The University of Texas at Austin, The Suida-Manning Collection, 2017", "Copyright_Type" : "public domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "painting", "Creation_Place2" : "Italian", "Department" : "European Paintings", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/2017.1168.tif", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/2017.1168.tif", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/2017.1168.tif", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/2017.1168.tif", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "2618", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 16458, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/16458", "Disp_Access_No" : "2017.1170", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "circa 1624-1625", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1624", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1625", "Disp_Title" : "Saint Mary Magdalene", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "Saint Mary Magdalene", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Guercino (Giovanni Francesco Barbieri)", "Sort_Artist" : "Guercino (Giovanni Francesco Barbieri)", "Disp_Dimen" : "114.94 cm x 94.3 cm (45 1/4 in. x 37 1/8 in.)", "Disp_Height" : "114.94 cm", "Disp_Width" : "94.3 cm", "Dimen_Extent" : "canvas", "Medium" : "Oil", "Support" : "canvas", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on canvas", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Guercino's style, its optical intensity and sensory appeal, offered an alternative to the more schematic naturalism of Caravaggio and the early classicism of Annibale Carracci. Guercino, however, was reciprocally affected by those prevailing currents, as well as by the weight of the city’s earlier artistic traditions. Just as other painters like Giovanni Lanfranco and Pietro da Cortona began to explore and extend the possibilities of Guercino’s style, he tempered them. This painting is an excellent example of Guercino’s shift toward a less intuitive style in the aftermath of his sojourn in Rome. Transcending her contemplation of death and repentance of sins, the Magdalene looks heavenward in a rapture that is echoed by the shaft of light from the upper left. Because her figure derives from a painting of around 1619, a Raising of Lazarus in the Louvre, Guercino’s development is all the more apparent. The composition is more deliberate, its forms more constructed, his touch more measured. What painting may have lost in restless vitality, it has gained in solemn power. Later, however, these tendencies would lead to an ever more self-conscious, and nonetheless beautiful, approximation of Baroque classicism. When Guercino went to Rome in 1621-23, he brought with him the style of the Suida-Manning Collection’s exquisite Landscape, to the left. That style, its optical intensity and sensory appeal, offered an alternative to the more schematic naturalism of Caravaggio and the early classicism of Annibale Carracci. Guercino, however, was reciprocally affected by those prevailing currents, as well as by the weight of the city’s earlier artistic traditions. Just as other painters like Giovanni Lanfranco and Pietro da Cortona began to explore and extend the possibilities of Guercino’s style, he tempered them.", "Dedication" : "Blanton Museum of Art, The University of Texas at Austin, The Suida-Manning Collection, 2017", "Copyright_Type" : "public domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "painting", "Creation_Place2" : "Italian", "Department" : "European Paintings", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "Higher up (FC:jb 4/2/15) Medallion (FC:jb 4/2/15)", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/2017.1170.tif", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/2017.1170.tif", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/2017.1170.tif", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/2017.1170.tif", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "2619", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] }, ] }