{ "objects" : [ { "embark_ID" : 20715, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/20715", "Disp_Access_No" : "", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "2013", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "2013", "_Disp_End_Date" : "2013", "Disp_Title" : "Untitled, from The Strangest Fruit", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "Untitled, from The Strangest Fruit", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Vincent Valdez", "Sort_Artist" : "Valdez, Vincent", "Disp_Dimen" : "233.68 cm x 139.7 cm (92 in. x 55 in.)", "Disp_Height" : "233.68 cm", "Disp_Width" : "139.7 cm", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Oil", "Support" : "canvas", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on canvas", "Info_Page_Comm" : "The title of this series of paintings, "The Strangest Fruit," hints at the history that inspired them. In 1939 Billie Holiday recorded “Strange Fruit,” a haunting song about the lynching of African Americans in the United States. 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